Basic Parts of an Airless Sprayer

Working with airless sprayer is a must if you want to be a professional painter. For every experienced painters know that airless spray is the fastest tool to distribute paint. However, working with airless sprayer is not as simple as working with paint brush or paint roller. You may need a little practice and knowledge on how to operate it. Below is information of some basic parts of an airless pump.

Thus, you can use this information as a guide before you begin your paint project with an airless sprayer.

– on/off switch
– Pressure control knob :  This knob is used to manage the pressure to push the paint through the pump.
– pick up tube : A large siphon tube that draws the paint from the bucket into the machine.
– Prime tube : A smaller flexible tube ejects paint to show you when it is primed
– Prime/spray knob: A knob to switch pump from the ‘prime mode’ to ‘spray mode’.
– Spray hose: A 50′ in length high-pressure hose that bring the paint from the pump to the gun.
– Gun: Functionate to control the spray. The gun is attached to the end of the spray hose and completed with a trigger.
– Guard: sticks onto the nozzle of the gun and manages the spray tip in place.
– Spray tip: Slides into the guard and atomizes the paint as it passes through it.

The spray tip will manage the amount of material that passes through the gun as well as the fan pattern size. Besides, you can figure out your spray tip size through the three numbers you see on the package. When you’re holding the gun 1 foot from the surface, you can see the first number is half the width of the spray pattern that you’ll see on the wall. The last two numbers are the orifice size. It should be selected based on your paint manufacturer.  For example, if your manufacturer asks for a 0.17 orifice size, so the right size should be 417. Then, make an 8″ wide spray pattern on your wall with each pass your gun.

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